Best Motivational Video for Students – Don’t Count the Cost

Best Motivational Video for Students – Don’t Count the Cost

Join me on http://facebook.com/motivationgrid for daily motivation
Visit our website – http://motivationgrid.com

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52 Inspirational Quotes That Can Change Your Life – http://motivationgrid.com/inspirational-quotes-transform-your-life/
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Speakers:
Eric Thomas –
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Music:
(00:57) Two Steps From Hell – Blackheart
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Special thanks to Kevin Tylecote – He had done the 2nd part of the video. I just added few speeches and made it a bit longer.

Check out his website about weight gaining at –

Get into your best shape by this year’s summer:
http://truthaboutweightgaining.com

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Motivational Speech about Education. Learn from this video and don’t drop out of school!
Video Rating: / 5

Big Think Interview With John Irving

Big Think Interview With John Irving

Big Think sits down with the author of twelve novels, including “Last Night in Twisted River.”
Video Rating: / 5

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Watch the rest of Niel deGrasse Tyson’s interview http://bigthink.com/neildegrassetyson. Neil deGrasse Tyson says Newton’s writings defy gravity by making his hair stand up.

Question: Who’s the greatest physicist in history?DeGrasse Tyson:    Isaac Newton.  I mean, just look… You read his writings.  Hair stands up… I don’t have hair there but if I did, it would stand up on the back of my neck.  You read his writings, the man was connected to the universe in ways that I never seen another human being connected.  It’s kind of spooky actually.  He discovers the laws of optics, figured out that white light is composed of colors.  That’s kind of freaky right there.  You take your colors of the rainbow, put them back together, you have white light again.  That freaked out the artist of the day.  How does that work?  Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet gives you white.  The laws of optics.  He discovers the laws of motion and the universal law of gravitation.  Then, a friend of his says, “Well, why do these orbits of the planets… Why are they in a shape of an ellipse, sort of flattened circle?  Why aren’t… some other shape?”  He said, you know, “I can’t… I don’t know.  I’ll get back to you.”  So he goes… goes home, comes back couple of months later, “Here’s why.  They’re actually conic sections, sections of a cone that you cut.”  And… And he said, “Well, how did find this out?  How did you determine this?”  “Well, I had to invent integral and differential calculus to determine this.”  Then, he turned 26.  Then, he turned 26.  We got people slogging through calculus in college just to learn what it is that Isaac Newtown invented on a dare, practically.  So that’s my man, Isaac Newton. 

Question: Who’s the greatest physicist in history?DeGrasse Tyson:    Isaac Newton.  I mean, just look… You read his writings.  Hair stands up… I don’t have hair there but if I did, it would stand up on the back of my neck.  You read his writings, the man was connected to the universe in ways that I never seen another human being connected.  It’s kind of spooky actually.  He discovers the laws of optics, figured out that white light is composed of colors.  That’s kind of freaky right there.  You take your colors of the rainbow, put them back together, you have white light again.  That freaked out the artist of the day.  How does that work?  Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet gives you white.  The laws of optics.  He discovers the laws of motion and the universal law of gravitation.  Then, a friend of his says, “Well, why do these orbits of the planets… Why are they in a shape of an ellipse, sort of flattened circle?  Why aren’t… some other shape?”  He said, you know, “I can’t… I don’t know.  I’ll get back to you.”  So he goes… goes home, comes back couple of months later, “Here’s why.  They’re actually conic sections, sections of a cone that you cut.”  And… And he said, “Well, how did find this out?  How did you determine this?”  “Well, I had to invent integral and differential calculus to determine this.”  Then, he turned 26.  Then, he turned 26.  We got people slogging through calculus in college just to learn what it is that Isaac Newtown invented on a dare, practically.  So that’s my man, Isaac Newton.

Who Won the Space Race?  – Jeff Steers

Who Won the Space Race? – Jeff Steers

Who won the space race?  - Jeff Steers

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-was-the-point-of-the-space-race-jeff-steers

On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the satellite Sputnik and, with it, an international space race. The United States and the Soviet Union rushed to declare dominance of space for 18 years, until the two countries agreed to a more collaborative model. The real winner? Science. Jeff Steers describes the history — and the benefits — of the space race.

Lesson by Jeff Steers, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.
Video Rating: / 5

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-we-dream-amy-adkins

In the 3rd millennium BCE, Mesopotamian kings recorded and interpreted their dreams on wax tablets. In the years since, we haven’t paused in our quest to understand why we dream. And while we still don’t have any definitive answers, we have some theories. Amy Adkins reveals the top seven reasons why we might dream.

Lesson by Amy Adkins, animation by Clamanne Studio.
Video Rating: / 5

Scott Rocco – Leadership Trends in Education: Social Media, Technology & Professional Development

Scott Rocco – Leadership Trends in Education: Social Media, Technology & Professional Development

Scott Rocco - Leadership Trends in Education: Social Media, Technology & Professional Development

Scott Rocco, Ed.D., is a Superintendent in New Jersey, adjunct professor at The College of New Jersey, instructor in the NJEXCEL program, presenter, and co-founder/co-moderator of #Satchat on Twitter. Scott has given keynote, conference and group presentations on the use of social media for educators, school safety, marketing yourself, and various leadership topics. He also blogs for edSocialMedia.com. Scott is dedicated to positively and productively engaging educators in a dialogue that improves student learning, enhances instruction, and creates effective learning environments for all who attend and work in schools. Follow Scott on Twitter @ScottRRocco. If you are interested in having Scott present, contact him at scottrocco@gmail.com.