The Benefits of a Bilingual Brain – Mia Nacamulli

The Benefits of a Bilingual Brain – Mia Nacamulli

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-speaking-multiple-languages-benefits-the-brain-mia-nacamulli

It’s obvious that knowing more than one language can make certain things easier — like traveling or watching movies without subtitles. But are there other advantages to having a bilingual (or multilingual) brain? Mia Nacamulli details the three types of bilingual brains and shows how knowing more than one language keeps your brain healthy, complex and actively engaged.

Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, animation by TED-Ed.
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Hey Bill Nye, ‘Do I Have to Choose Between a Science and Arts Education?’ #TuesdaysWithBill

Hey Bill Nye, ‘Do I Have to Choose Between a Science and Arts Education?’ #TuesdaysWithBill

Bill Nye the Science Guy explains how reinvigorating basic research and development in our schools resulted in the acronym STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), and why new acronyms are emerging.

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Transcript – Sam Passer: Hi Bill Nye this is Sam Passer. And my question for you is, as an art student myself, do I have to choose between art and science for our next generations to thrive or can art and science coexist? Please let me know. Thanks.

Bill Nye: Sam! Sam! Sam! Art and science have to coexist. They’re both human endeavors. However, just keep in mind I am a science guy and like this that science, this process that humans have developed seems to be, to my way of thinking, the best idea we’ve had, the best idea we’ve had about how to know nature, how to know our place in the world, in the cosmos. But without art we would hardly be people. Art is created by people and it inspires each of us. It’s the way we send messages. It’s the way we motivate each other or keep each other from doing something. Art is part of us. We don’t want art or science, we want to both. With that said, a little commentary about our current controversy in education in the United States, everybody goes on and on with this acronym STEM, STEM, STEM, STEM, STEM: science, technology, engineering and math. And this is a fine acronym. It talks about or it was created to address what was a clear need here in the United States after people landed on the moon, investment in basic research was curtailed, except in the military spending. And so we stopped, the United States stopped doing as much basic research as it had been doing and so to reinvigorate this people created this acronym and there’s all these science, technology, engineering and math programs in school. It’s good. It’s good. Now people talk about STEAM: science, technology, engineering, art and math. Well good. Yes. And I’ve heard STEAMD: science, technology, engineering, art, math and design. Okay. Pretty soon the acronym is going to have all the letters that we would call the school, just school. You go to school and you’ve got to have math; you’ve got to have language arts, English in my case and the United States were English is the primary language; you’ve got to have a history; you got to have a – I’d like us to have civics about the U.S. Constitution and the behavior and the way the government is created; and we’ve got to have art; you got to have science. Yes. We’ve got to have all of that. But this tacking stuff on this acronym that became so popular, STEM, is okay, everybody but let’s not forget we got to do everything. It’s not one or the other. Please, it’s not one or the other.

Learn the process of science. You don’t have to become a scientist full-time or an engineer full-time. And for those of you who love science and engineering I hope you pursue some art and learn some art and how to create art yourself and appreciate it. It’s what makes us people. Go for it.

Daniel Koretz says, though it’s difficult to compare testing in developed countries, most indicators show the US lagging behind.

Daniel Koretz:
Bad news sells.  And, in fact, I recently heard someone basically say that the only way to get attention to education is through bad news.  And that may be part of the problem.  We do score… Our kids do score less well than some kids in other countries and that’s not new.  So there’s a fairly, there’s a long standing and fairly stable difference in performance in mathematics between our kids and the kids in all of developed East Asia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Korea which wasn’t developed until [two years ago].  That’s fairly stable.  What you get when you compare us to countries that are more similar to us, Australia, New Zealand, England, Scotland, maybe even Germany is little less clear because the results are not consistent from one test to another.  One test puts us pretty much in the same league as countries like Australia and Canada.  Another test, the PISA test run by the OECD in Paris suggests that our kids are behind in mathematics.  I think it’s… We don’t know because the tests aren’t designed to allow us to sort this out very well, but it appears that it’s because the test measure different things.  The test that measure what’s taught in school put us higher up relative to those countries.  The one that measures application to more realistic problems shows us falling a little further behind.

Daniel Koretz:
Bad news sells.  And, in fact, I recently heard someone basically say that the only way to get attention to education is through bad news.  And that may be part of the problem.  We do score… Our kids do score less well than some kids in other countries and that’s not new.  So there’s a fairly, there’s a long standing and fairly stable difference in performance in mathematics between our kids and the kids in all of developed East Asia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Korea which wasn’t developed until [two years ago].  That’s fairly stable.  What you get when you compare us to countries that are more similar to us, Australia, New Zealand, England, Scotland, maybe even Germany is little less clear because the results are not consistent from one test to another.  One test puts us pretty much in the same league as countries like Australia and Canada.  Another test, the PISA test run by the OECD in Paris suggests that our kids are behind in mathematics.  I think it’s… We don’t know because the tests aren’t designed to allow us to sort this out very well, but it appears that it’s because the test measure different things.  The test that measure what’s taught in school put us higher up relative to those countries.  The one that measures application to more realistic problems shows us falling a little further behind.
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What Works When Teaching Reading in Special Education Settings – Cyndie Fountaine

What Works When Teaching Reading in Special Education Settings – Cyndie Fountaine

Learn more at: http://www.readinghorizons.com/method/k_6.aspx

When teaching students with special needs in inclusive classrooms, many people employ team teaching techniques. Discover how kids with special needs often split their time with a homeroom and a teacher who provides individual instruction with help from a special education teacher in this free video on teaching students with special needs.

Expert: Julie Peebles
Bio: Julie Peebles graduated from Appalachian State University with a Bachelor of Science in special education and learning disabilities.
Filmmaker: Rendered Communications
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Bill Clinton on Lifelong Learning

Bill Clinton on Lifelong Learning

President Bill Clinton answers the question “What is the most important thing you have learned?” at the Global Education and Skills Forum 2014.

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Find out more about the Global Education & Skills Forum: http://www.educationandskillsforum.org

Transcript — I think the most important thing that I have learned is that there’s more to learn. That we should — that we should all be hungry for a lifetime. I mean, for example, at my next birthday I’ll be 68. All the great scientific discoveries made by all the great geniuses were largely made when they were in their 20s and 30s. And yet I became, about two years ago, obsessed with particle physics and I was determined to understand it before I died. I could not have done that if I hadn’t learned to read when I was young. If I hadn’t had the opportunity to study science courses in my high school, and I lived in the second poorest state in the United States, which most people my age in my state did not have. I happened to go to a bigger high school with people who understood we had to get good science and math teachers there.

And if I hadn’t gone to, in my case, Georgetown University, which was a Jesuit University, and I hadn’t been subject to the kind of rigors that the Jesuits imposed which made me realize that however much I thought I knew and however smart I was I didn’t know very much and I wasn’t very smart. I had a lot to learn. So that’s the most important thing I learned that your brain is a gift. And we now know that people well into their late 60s and 70s can form new neural networks. So that even though your brain begins to shrink in your 30s, and does throughout your life, since none of us ever use even close to half of our brainpower we got a lot left and we will on our last day on earth we’ll have a lot left.

So, the idea that we now know, as a scientific measure because of all the brain scanning technology that we can form these networks and that we form them best, we’re most likely to form new neural networks later in life by learning something new. So if — I said I was interested in particle physics and also in astrophysics and I’m trying to figure out what it means that we’ve located 20 planets outside our solar system in the last five years that seem to have enough density and be far enough away from their sons that they might be able to support life. That may be the answer to the Russia Ukraine problem; an attack from outer space will immediately unite us all.

Members of Congress in the U.S. will immediately start hugging each other and singing Kumbaya. But anyway, I can form new neural networks doing that because I don’t know anything about it, or I didn’t when I started. A theoretical physicist would do better going to Suzuki piano lessons with his grandchild or her grandchild and just playing if you knew nothing about music. But this is an incredible thing that the most important thing I learned is that it’s important to keep on learning. That you should stay hungry and that the greatest gift can be even as your body begins to fail if your minds still working you need to use it.

Produced by Jonathan Fowler
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