The Importance of the Arts

The Importance of the Arts

Art can change a child’s life.

Question: Do you recall a pivotal moment in your childhood?
Dana Gioia: I mean I had about 500 small epiphanies that brought me from one place to another.  I mean there are certain things that would have happened to change my life.  For example, I was in a very ugly, ugly place.  There was no open land.  There was nothing beautiful to look at in Hawthorne.  And I didn’t know it at the time, but I was starved for beauty.  And one night on TV there was a documentary on Michelangelo, and I just watched it with, you know, agog.  And the next day I went to this large, public library a few blocks from my house, took out an art book and, really for the next five or six years, I read every book in this large depository . . . library on art.  And this was when I was about 10 or 11, so obviously that’s something that, even though I’ve never been a painter or a visual arts critic, it was one of the things that brought me into the arts.  One of the things that opened up the idea of history, the idea of aesthetics to me.  You know, in the same way that these little glimpses that one got planted seeds that really paid off years and years later.  That’s one of the reasons I think, as Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, I consider arts education so important.  Even if it’s just exposing kids to a single things once.  Because for somebody in the audience, it will change their life for the better.
Recorded On: 7/6/07

Question: Do you recall a pivotal moment in your childhood?
Dana Gioia: I mean I had about 500 small epiphanies that brought me from one place to another.  I mean there are certain things that would have happened to change my life.  For example, I was in a very ugly, ugly place.  There was no open land.  There was nothing beautiful to look at in Hawthorne.  And I didn’t know it at the time, but I was starved for beauty.  And one night on TV there was a documentary on Michelangelo, and I just watched it with, you know, agog.  And the next day I went to this large, public library a few blocks from my house, took out an art book and, really for the next five or six years, I read every book in this large depository . . . library on art.  And this was when I was about 10 or 11, so obviously that’s something that, even though I’ve never been a painter or a visual arts critic, it was one of the things that brought me into the arts.  One of the things that opened up the idea of history, the idea of aesthetics to me.  You know, in the same way that these little glimpses that one got planted seeds that really paid off years and years later.  That’s one of the reasons I think, as Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, I consider arts education so important.  Even if it’s just exposing kids to a single things once.  Because for somebody in the audience, it will change their life for the better.
Recorded On: 7/6/07

Much to the chagrin of NASA rocket scientist Dr. Wernher von Braun, President Nixon chose instead to greenlight the space shuttle program because it intrigued the military-industrial complex. Stephen Petranek’s new book is “How We’ll Live on Mars” (http://goo.gl/YcJeUb).

Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/stephen-petranek-on-werner-von-braun

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Transcript – When the Apollo program was coming to an end von Braun was running through the halls of Congress trying to convince congressmen that the next project after the Apollo program should be sending humans to Mars. Unlike many other proposals he had made in the past that proposal actually ended up on the desk of President Richard M. Nixon. Now a lot of people don’t understand this but the President is not only the commander in chief, he’s the commander in chief of NASA. NASA is actually an administrative function in our government and it reports directly to the President of the United States. So in the early 70s Nixon had two proposals sitting on his desk. One was let’s send somebody to Mars. The competing proposal was the Space Shuttle. Now the Space Shuttle originally was a very cool concept. It is exactly what Elon Musk is trying to do with rockets right now by making them reusable. And it was a relatively small space plane that could shuttle astronauts into Earth orbit and then where you would have the capability of building a larger rocket that could go on to places like Mars. Unfortunately the military and the intelligence agencies of the United States became very interested in the Space Shuttle and a conflict developed. Nixon chose the Space Shuttle over going to Mars, over von Braun’s program. And shortly thereafter von Braun resigned from NASA. And not long after that he died. Had Nixon chosen in the early 70s to go to Mars instead of building the Space Shuttle we would have a colony on Mars now. And there would probably be thousands of people there.

The tragedy of the Space Shuttle was that it was really kind of designed for the military industrial complex rather than what NASA really had in mind originally which was a cheap small reusable rocket. The joke is that there were 11 secret missions that we know of between 1982 and 1992 in which used the Space Shuttle for military and intelligence purposes. We have no real idea what those were. They were classified but we do know that they existed and that those rockets were launched and used for that purpose. Here is a that from day one was supposed to be completely open and transparent because we did not want other countries thinking that we looked like explorers of space and we looked like people who were only interested in intellectual curiosity and finding out more about our environment when in fact at the same time we were doing military things. So for the last five decades, from 1970 at least the space program has been stunted and has gone absolutely nowhere. And that’s why we have people like SpaceX who are going to bet the first to land on Mars because they’ve created this huge hole of low cost entry into space. And governments are now losing control of space that they’ve had as a monopoly. And private companies are finding it quite easy to do things faster, better and cheaper than NASA or the military can do them. And they’re going to get into long term space first.

Equality, Sports, and Title IX – Erin Buzuvis and Kristine Newhall

Equality, Sports, and Title IX – Erin Buzuvis and Kristine Newhall

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/equality-sports-and-title-ix-erin-buzuvis-and-kristine-newhall

In 1972, U.S. Congress passed Title IX, a law which prohibited discrimination against women in schools, colleges, and universities — including school-sponsored sports. Before this law, female athletes were few and far between, and funding was even scarcer. Erin Buzuvis and Kristine Newhall explore the significance and complexity of Title IX.

Lesson by Erin Buzuvis and Kristine Newhall, animation by Kat Llewellyn.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/3-tips-to-boost-your-confidence-ted-ed

Made in partnership with the Always #LikeAGirl campaign.

When faced with a big challenge where potential failure seems to lurk at every corner, you’ve probably heard the advice, “Be more confident!” But where does confidence come from, and how can you get more of it? Here are three easy tips to boost your confidence.

Lesson by TED-Ed, animation by Kozmonot Animation Studio.

How a Great Leader Motivates

How a Great Leader Motivates

The story of a school principal whose outstanding motivational skills can teach all educators a lesson.

Question: What does motivational leadership look like when it’s done well?
Pedro Noguera:  Sure.   Not far from P.S. 012, which I mentioned is P.S. 028, which is **** the other side of Atlantic Avenue.  This is a school where over 40% of the kids are homeless and the principal there is 34.  It’s a highly effective school, a high performing school.  The principal there when I took a tour there last year she introduced me to her secretary.  She said, “I’ve trained my secretary to do most of my administrative jobs.”  I said, “Well then what do you do?”  She says, “I am the lead teacher at the school.”  “I’m in classrooms all day.”  “I work with teachers and I teach the kids that teachers don’t know how to teach because I want to make it clear to my teachers that I didn’t become a principal to escape the classroom.”  “I became a principal to be the leader of the classrooms.”  And I watched her as she interacted with teachers and it was very clear that she saw them as colleagues, as part of a team, that even though she was clearly the leader she was also there to support them and at what point I said, “Well how do you get along with the union?”  She said, “Let me introduce you to my union rep.”  And it was very clear that they were partners in this effort and working well together.  So you know what she has is something that is very difficult to teach, which is a high degree of social intelligence.  She knows how to work with people.  She knows how to bring the best of people.  She knows how to read people and understand their strengths.  At one point when I was visiting the school she said…  She took me to a small office where there was an older man counseling a little boy and I said…  She said, “You see that man there?”  I said, “Yeah.”  And she says, “I got him from the rubber room.”  Now those people who don’t know New York, the rubber room is a place where they put teachers and school staff that nobody wants and they stay there indefinitely and get paid and it’s really a horrendous situation.  So I said to her I said, “How did you know to get him out of the rubber room?” She said, “Well, I don’t know why he was there, but he had been my counselor when I was a kid in school, so when I heard he was in the rubber room I asked for him and I brought him to my school.”  So I sat in and I introduced myself and they introduced me to the little boy who was there talking to him, so the counselor said, “Well, ask this little boy why he is here today.”  So I said, “Why are you here?”  The boy was about eight years old.  He says, “I’m learning how to be good.”  I said, “You’re learning how to be good.”  I said, “Is it working?”  He said, “I hope so because I’m tired of getting in trouble all of the time.”  And what struck me was it was a conversation.  It was a friendly conversation going on between this older man and this little boy.  It wasn’t about we’re going to throw you out of school.  We’re going to punish you.  It was about trying to really get at the roots of helping this boy learn to become responsible for his own behavior.  Not enough schools do that.
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