The Countries of the World Song – Asia

The Countries of the World Song – Asia

A video which shows all the countries in Asia.
This song was written and performed by A.J. Jenkins. Video by KidsTV123.
Copyright 2011: All rights reserved
For MP3s, worksheets and much more:
http://www.KidsTV123.com

kids songs song for children
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Top 10 Best Apps for Students // Free Student Apps

Top 10 Best Apps for Students // Free Student Apps

I WISH I knew about these life-saving student apps when I was in my first year of university. Don’t miss out on these gems – especially since they are all free to download and will help you get those As this semester. Let me know which one YOU will be trying out? 🙂

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How to Study Effectively | 15 Study Tips

How to Study Effectively | 15 Study Tips

How To Study Effectively | 15 Study Tips

How To Study Effectively | 10 Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qquscVH7goY&list=UUxiczudWQ_Eh-RPLX4qI4Pg&index=31&spfreload=10

This video was so highly requested! I hope you all enjoy

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Daniel Goleman Introduces Emotional Intelligence

Daniel Goleman Introduces Emotional Intelligence

The author explains his theories of emotional intelligence.
Video Rating: / 5

http://bigthink.com

Heidi Hammel rose to the challenge of a difficult college course.

Topic: Becoming an Astronomer
Heidi Hammel: My entry into astronomy was purely by chance.  I never set out to be an astronomer, or even a scientist, but when I was in college I had an elective course to take, and astronomy was one of the electives, and it looked like fun.  So I said, “Okay, I’ll take that course.”  And I remember when I walked into the class, there were only three other people in the room.  Two of them were male graduate students, and one of them was a senior, and me, a sophomore girl.  And I remember going in to the professor and saying, “I don’t think that I belong in this class.”  He said, “No, no.  This is for you.  I want this class to be for sophomores, you know.  Stay in the class.”  And a few weeks went by, and I was really struggling in college, and it was clear to me I had to drop a course.  And I was either going to drop my astronomy course or drop my history course.  I went in to the professor and I said, “I really.  I think I need to drop your class because I need to drop one class, and I don’t have any data yet for my project”, and blah blah blah.”  He said, “Look.  Let’s go out to our observatory tonight.”  We had a little observatory. “And see if you can get some data, and if you do, then you could write your project.  It’ll be fine.”  And he said, in retrospect, thank goodness it was clear that night because I did get my data, and I stayed in the astronomy course and dropped my history course, and, you know, there was no going back from there.  I discovered that what I like to do is use equipment and the bigger the better.  I love to be looking into space and being the first person to see something.  It’s like being an explorer, but not having to leave the surface of the earth or travel across an ocean.  And yet you know some of the things that you see, you’re the only person in the world who’s ever seen that.  It’s a really exciting feeling to be an explorer and to be able to bring that information back and share with people.  I just love that thrill, that excitement, to be right on the edge of something.
 

Topic: Becoming an Astronomer
Heidi Hammel: My entry into astronomy was purely by chance.  I never set out to be an astronomer, or even a scientist, but when I was in college I had an elective course to take, and astronomy was one of the electives, and it looked like fun.  So I said, “Okay, I’ll take that course.”  And I remember when I walked into the class, there were only three other people in the room.  Two of them were male graduate students, and one of them was a senior, and me, a sophomore girl.  And I remember going in to the professor and saying, “I don’t think that I belong in this class.”  He said, “No, no.  This is for you.  I want this class to be for sophomores, you know.  Stay in the class.”  And a few weeks went by, and I was really struggling in college, and it was clear to me I had to drop a course.  And I was either going to drop my astronomy course or drop my history course.  I went in to the professor and I said, “I really.  I think I need to drop your class because I need to drop one class, and I don’t have any data yet for my project”, and blah blah blah.”  He said, “Look.  Let’s go out to our observatory tonight.”  We had a little observatory. “And see if you can get some data, and if you do, then you could write your project.  It’ll be fine.”  And he said, in retrospect, thank goodness it was clear that night because I did get my data, and I stayed in the astronomy course and dropped my history course, and, you know, there was no going back from there.  I discovered that what I like to do is use equipment and the bigger the better.  I love to be looking into space and being the first person to see something.  It’s like being an explorer, but not having to leave the surface of the earth or travel across an ocean.  And yet you know some of the things that you see, you’re the only person in the world who’s ever seen that.  It’s a really exciting feeling to be an explorer and to be able to bring that information back and share with people.  I just love that thrill, that excitement, to be right on the edge of something.

Hey Bill Nye, ‘Do I Have to Choose Between a Science and Arts Education?’ #TuesdaysWithBill

Hey Bill Nye, ‘Do I Have to Choose Between a Science and Arts Education?’ #TuesdaysWithBill

Bill Nye the Science Guy explains how reinvigorating basic research and development in our schools resulted in the acronym STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), and why new acronyms are emerging.

Do you want to ask Bill a question for a future “Tuesdays with Bill?” Click here to learn how to submit: (http://goo.gl/Joiqzo).

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Transcript – Sam Passer: Hi Bill Nye this is Sam Passer. And my question for you is, as an art student myself, do I have to choose between art and science for our next generations to thrive or can art and science coexist? Please let me know. Thanks.

Bill Nye: Sam! Sam! Sam! Art and science have to coexist. They’re both human endeavors. However, just keep in mind I am a science guy and like this that science, this process that humans have developed seems to be, to my way of thinking, the best idea we’ve had, the best idea we’ve had about how to know nature, how to know our place in the world, in the cosmos. But without art we would hardly be people. Art is created by people and it inspires each of us. It’s the way we send messages. It’s the way we motivate each other or keep each other from doing something. Art is part of us. We don’t want art or science, we want to both. With that said, a little commentary about our current controversy in education in the United States, everybody goes on and on with this acronym STEM, STEM, STEM, STEM, STEM: science, technology, engineering and math. And this is a fine acronym. It talks about or it was created to address what was a clear need here in the United States after people landed on the moon, investment in basic research was curtailed, except in the military spending. And so we stopped, the United States stopped doing as much basic research as it had been doing and so to reinvigorate this people created this acronym and there’s all these science, technology, engineering and math programs in school. It’s good. It’s good. Now people talk about STEAM: science, technology, engineering, art and math. Well good. Yes. And I’ve heard STEAMD: science, technology, engineering, art, math and design. Okay. Pretty soon the acronym is going to have all the letters that we would call the school, just school. You go to school and you’ve got to have math; you’ve got to have language arts, English in my case and the United States were English is the primary language; you’ve got to have a history; you got to have a – I’d like us to have civics about the U.S. Constitution and the behavior and the way the government is created; and we’ve got to have art; you got to have science. Yes. We’ve got to have all of that. But this tacking stuff on this acronym that became so popular, STEM, is okay, everybody but let’s not forget we got to do everything. It’s not one or the other. Please, it’s not one or the other.

Learn the process of science. You don’t have to become a scientist full-time or an engineer full-time. And for those of you who love science and engineering I hope you pursue some art and learn some art and how to create art yourself and appreciate it. It’s what makes us people. Go for it.

Daniel Koretz says, though it’s difficult to compare testing in developed countries, most indicators show the US lagging behind.

Daniel Koretz:
Bad news sells.  And, in fact, I recently heard someone basically say that the only way to get attention to education is through bad news.  And that may be part of the problem.  We do score… Our kids do score less well than some kids in other countries and that’s not new.  So there’s a fairly, there’s a long standing and fairly stable difference in performance in mathematics between our kids and the kids in all of developed East Asia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Korea which wasn’t developed until [two years ago].  That’s fairly stable.  What you get when you compare us to countries that are more similar to us, Australia, New Zealand, England, Scotland, maybe even Germany is little less clear because the results are not consistent from one test to another.  One test puts us pretty much in the same league as countries like Australia and Canada.  Another test, the PISA test run by the OECD in Paris suggests that our kids are behind in mathematics.  I think it’s… We don’t know because the tests aren’t designed to allow us to sort this out very well, but it appears that it’s because the test measure different things.  The test that measure what’s taught in school put us higher up relative to those countries.  The one that measures application to more realistic problems shows us falling a little further behind.

Daniel Koretz:
Bad news sells.  And, in fact, I recently heard someone basically say that the only way to get attention to education is through bad news.  And that may be part of the problem.  We do score… Our kids do score less well than some kids in other countries and that’s not new.  So there’s a fairly, there’s a long standing and fairly stable difference in performance in mathematics between our kids and the kids in all of developed East Asia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Korea which wasn’t developed until [two years ago].  That’s fairly stable.  What you get when you compare us to countries that are more similar to us, Australia, New Zealand, England, Scotland, maybe even Germany is little less clear because the results are not consistent from one test to another.  One test puts us pretty much in the same league as countries like Australia and Canada.  Another test, the PISA test run by the OECD in Paris suggests that our kids are behind in mathematics.  I think it’s… We don’t know because the tests aren’t designed to allow us to sort this out very well, but it appears that it’s because the test measure different things.  The test that measure what’s taught in school put us higher up relative to those countries.  The one that measures application to more realistic problems shows us falling a little further behind.
Video Rating: / 5

CNN – Seasonal Affective Disorder or Winter Blues

CNN – Seasonal Affective Disorder or Winter Blues

Seasonal Affective Disorder or Winter Blues; Lincoln Memorial, Place for Americans to Protest and Celebrate.
Stories from around the world highlight this edition of CNN Student News, as we lead with events in Venezuela and Russia. We’ll also explore what seasonal affective disorder is, and we’ll explain why Presidents Day officially doesn’t exist.

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Student News with English Subtitles.
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