Bill Clinton on Lifelong Learning

Bill Clinton on Lifelong Learning

President Bill Clinton answers the question “What is the most important thing you have learned?” at the Global Education and Skills Forum 2014.

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Find out more about the Global Education & Skills Forum: http://www.educationandskillsforum.org

Transcript — I think the most important thing that I have learned is that there’s more to learn. That we should — that we should all be hungry for a lifetime. I mean, for example, at my next birthday I’ll be 68. All the great scientific discoveries made by all the great geniuses were largely made when they were in their 20s and 30s. And yet I became, about two years ago, obsessed with particle physics and I was determined to understand it before I died. I could not have done that if I hadn’t learned to read when I was young. If I hadn’t had the opportunity to study science courses in my high school, and I lived in the second poorest state in the United States, which most people my age in my state did not have. I happened to go to a bigger high school with people who understood we had to get good science and math teachers there.

And if I hadn’t gone to, in my case, Georgetown University, which was a Jesuit University, and I hadn’t been subject to the kind of rigors that the Jesuits imposed which made me realize that however much I thought I knew and however smart I was I didn’t know very much and I wasn’t very smart. I had a lot to learn. So that’s the most important thing I learned that your brain is a gift. And we now know that people well into their late 60s and 70s can form new neural networks. So that even though your brain begins to shrink in your 30s, and does throughout your life, since none of us ever use even close to half of our brainpower we got a lot left and we will on our last day on earth we’ll have a lot left.

So, the idea that we now know, as a scientific measure because of all the brain scanning technology that we can form these networks and that we form them best, we’re most likely to form new neural networks later in life by learning something new. So if — I said I was interested in particle physics and also in astrophysics and I’m trying to figure out what it means that we’ve located 20 planets outside our solar system in the last five years that seem to have enough density and be far enough away from their sons that they might be able to support life. That may be the answer to the Russia Ukraine problem; an attack from outer space will immediately unite us all.

Members of Congress in the U.S. will immediately start hugging each other and singing Kumbaya. But anyway, I can form new neural networks doing that because I don’t know anything about it, or I didn’t when I started. A theoretical physicist would do better going to Suzuki piano lessons with his grandchild or her grandchild and just playing if you knew nothing about music. But this is an incredible thing that the most important thing I learned is that it’s important to keep on learning. That you should stay hungry and that the greatest gift can be even as your body begins to fail if your minds still working you need to use it.

Produced by Jonathan Fowler
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Who Won the Space Race?  – Jeff Steers

Who Won the Space Race? – Jeff Steers

Who won the space race?  - Jeff Steers

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-was-the-point-of-the-space-race-jeff-steers

On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the satellite Sputnik and, with it, an international space race. The United States and the Soviet Union rushed to declare dominance of space for 18 years, until the two countries agreed to a more collaborative model. The real winner? Science. Jeff Steers describes the history — and the benefits — of the space race.

Lesson by Jeff Steers, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-we-dream-amy-adkins

In the 3rd millennium BCE, Mesopotamian kings recorded and interpreted their dreams on wax tablets. In the years since, we haven’t paused in our quest to understand why we dream. And while we still don’t have any definitive answers, we have some theories. Amy Adkins reveals the top seven reasons why we might dream.

Lesson by Amy Adkins, animation by Clamanne Studio.
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Finding Funding for Instructional Technology

Finding Funding for Instructional Technology

TeacherTube User: Dreamboxlearning

TeacherTube URL: http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=241730

This is a math video lesson to help you with new math, math tricks, and or simple math questions you may have.

The webinar is presented by Jon Bernstein a respected expert on issues related to federal education appropriations.
Federal funding opportunities for education technology
New technology funding opportunities in a reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act
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HP Classroom of the Future – Official Video

HP Classroom of the Future – Official Video

HP Classroom of the future http://www.mobilegeeks.com HP is looking to shape our future leaders by bringing interactive, integrated, flexible solutions to the classroom. If you’re wondering what the classroom of the future will look like, the’ve gone and built one in Taipei Taiwan to give the world a sneak peak.

HP has built the classroom of the future with a 132 inch VantagePoint Touchwall that connects with a couple dozen All in One PCs and is controlled with a tablet, the HP Envy X2. If you want to see how the leaders of tomorrow are learning today, check out HP’s vision for the future.
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Innovation in Education Technology

Innovation in Education Technology

The ANU College of Asia and the Pacific at the Australian National University hosted an event to showcase innovative uses of technology in education. Organised by the Digital Learning Project to promote sustainable blended and online learning environments for education programs across the university.

It will promoted the creative use of online and multi-media resources to enhance the learning experience of our students. The Digital Leaning Project aims to develop a community of scholars in which inspired undergraduate and postgraduate students interact with staff in an innovative teaching and learning environment.

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/digital-learning/
http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/

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Video Produced by the Digital Learning Project
Camera: Carl Reinecke, Josh Owen, Rafael Florez
Edit: Rafael Florez
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Technology is changing the world rapidly, impacting the way students learn and opening new possibilities for educators. Take a look what Sir Ken Robinson had to say when asked about the role of technology in education.

Follow the series at http://adobe.ly/YT121R

How is technology is changing your classroom? Do you find that it is allowing for greater creatvitity? Join the conversation on Twitter using the #createnow hashtag and be sure to tag us at @adobeedu!
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