Hey Bill Nye, ‘Do I Have to Choose Between a Science and Arts Education?’ #TuesdaysWithBill

Hey Bill Nye, ‘Do I Have to Choose Between a Science and Arts Education?’ #TuesdaysWithBill

Bill Nye the Science Guy explains how reinvigorating basic research and development in our schools resulted in the acronym STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), and why new acronyms are emerging.

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Transcript – Sam Passer: Hi Bill Nye this is Sam Passer. And my question for you is, as an art student myself, do I have to choose between art and science for our next generations to thrive or can art and science coexist? Please let me know. Thanks.

Bill Nye: Sam! Sam! Sam! Art and science have to coexist. They’re both human endeavors. However, just keep in mind I am a science guy and like this that science, this process that humans have developed seems to be, to my way of thinking, the best idea we’ve had, the best idea we’ve had about how to know nature, how to know our place in the world, in the cosmos. But without art we would hardly be people. Art is created by people and it inspires each of us. It’s the way we send messages. It’s the way we motivate each other or keep each other from doing something. Art is part of us. We don’t want art or science, we want to both. With that said, a little commentary about our current controversy in education in the United States, everybody goes on and on with this acronym STEM, STEM, STEM, STEM, STEM: science, technology, engineering and math. And this is a fine acronym. It talks about or it was created to address what was a clear need here in the United States after people landed on the moon, investment in basic research was curtailed, except in the military spending. And so we stopped, the United States stopped doing as much basic research as it had been doing and so to reinvigorate this people created this acronym and there’s all these science, technology, engineering and math programs in school. It’s good. It’s good. Now people talk about STEAM: science, technology, engineering, art and math. Well good. Yes. And I’ve heard STEAMD: science, technology, engineering, art, math and design. Okay. Pretty soon the acronym is going to have all the letters that we would call the school, just school. You go to school and you’ve got to have math; you’ve got to have language arts, English in my case and the United States were English is the primary language; you’ve got to have a history; you got to have a – I’d like us to have civics about the U.S. Constitution and the behavior and the way the government is created; and we’ve got to have art; you got to have science. Yes. We’ve got to have all of that. But this tacking stuff on this acronym that became so popular, STEM, is okay, everybody but let’s not forget we got to do everything. It’s not one or the other. Please, it’s not one or the other.

Learn the process of science. You don’t have to become a scientist full-time or an engineer full-time. And for those of you who love science and engineering I hope you pursue some art and learn some art and how to create art yourself and appreciate it. It’s what makes us people. Go for it.
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There must be science and math protocols.

David Pogue: It’s a bigger problem than I know what to say. Obviously it’s a priority issue. I don’t know how you translate that. Is it something on the parenting level? Is it something to do with funding? Is it set from the very top? Is it a Presidential thing? I don’t really know.
There’s a lot of smart people working on the problem, but all I know is that the problem exists and it distresses me personally.
I do not come across a lot of tech-savvy women. Year after year after year, it’s the same thing. The PR people are women, and if I have a question they’ll pass me along to the male engineers who can answer the question. I don’t know if there’s a built-in bias in the system, or if there might just be an inclination. I know this will generate tons of letters but, you know, it may be that fewer women are interested. I don’t know.
At one point, I wrote in a column [for the New York Times] the fact that older people generally have a harder time adapting to new technologies than younger people, which I think was as safe a generalization as one could possibly make. But of course I heard from all these old people, like, “How dare you? You know, I can use a Blackberry with the best of ’em.” But it’s a generalization. It doesn’t mean that every single person is in that category. Yes, I know that.
But I know as a 45-year-old it’s harder for me to pick up new things than when I was 20. Again, I’ve been a computer tutor my entire life and I can see it in the ages of people that I teach. So I still believe that’s true. So politically uncorrect [sic] as it may be, it may be true that there are differences between older people and younger people, and between men and women.
Recorded on: May 15, 2008.

David Pogue: It’s a bigger problem than I know what to say. Obviously it’s a priority issue. I don’t know how you translate that. Is it something on the parenting level? Is it something to do with funding? Is it set from the very top? Is it a Presidential thing? I don’t really know.
There’s a lot of smart people working on the problem, but all I know is that the problem exists and it distresses me personally.
I do not come across a lot of tech-savvy women. Year after year after year, it’s the same thing. The PR people are women, and if I have a question they’ll pass me along to the male engineers who can answer the question. I don’t know if there’s a built-in bias in the system, or if there might just be an inclination. I know this will generate tons of letters but, you know, it may be that fewer women are interested. I don’t know.
At one point, I wrote in a column [for the New York Times] the fact that older people generally have a harder time adapting to new technologies than younger people, which I think was as safe a generalization as one could possibly make. But of course I heard from all these old people, like, “How dare you? You know, I can use a Blackberry with the best of ’em.” But it’s a generalization. It doesn’t mean that every single person is in that category. Yes, I know that.
But I know as a 45-year-old it’s harder for me to pick up new things than when I was 20. Again, I’ve been a computer tutor my entire life and I can see it in the ages of people that I teach. So I still believe that’s true. So politically uncorrect [sic] as it may be, it may be true that there are differences between older people and younger people, and between men and women.
Recorded on: May 15, 2008.
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Technology in Education: A Future Classroom

Technology in Education: A Future Classroom

• Official Selection, 2014 White House Student Film Festival
• Best Special Effects, 2014 Rockland Youth Film Festival
• Featured as part of the ZKM | Center for Art and Media’s “Exo-Evolution” exhibit in Karlsruhe, Germany (October 30, 2015—February 28, 2016)
• 2nd Place Experimental Film (Professional Subdivision), 2014 My Hero International Film Festival

CREDITS
Directed/Written/Edited/Visual Effects by Daniel Nemroff (Class of 2015)
Cinematography — Daniel Nemroff and Noah Silvestry
Casting and Grip — Samuel Kruger and John Gallagher

Featuring (in order of appearance):
Alex Nichol
Odette Moolten
John Gallagher
Josh Weisgrau
Shira Prusky
Krishna Kahn
Will Keith
Alexander Horikawa-Torno
Jenna Bergmann
Marissa Gratz
Nicky Kirschner
Samson Zaoutis
Talia Rosenberg
Jessica Weiss
Matt Blackman
David Abrams
Daniel Nemroff
Sam Kruger
Colin Roberts
Dr. Hanson
Alex Kalman
Sahva Gebrehiwet
Hannah Lafferty
Grace McDonnell
Adam Trask

Acetic Acid 3D Model by John Gallagher

Special Thanks:
Ken Kirschner
Dr. Hanson
Colin Angevine and Josh Weisgrau
Friends’ Central School

I have permission to use the audio in this film.

~ Be sure to like this video and Subscribe! ~

Find me online:
Website (go here to get in touch) – http://Nemroff.Pictures
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Facebook – http://facebook.com/nemroffpictures
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We partnered with Toledo Public Schools to create a video demonstrating technology in the classroom. Starting from elementary all the way through to college.
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Can Online Education Help You Find a Job? Where Can You Find Online College Rankings? CNN Reports.

Can Online Education Help You Find a Job? Where Can You Find Online College Rankings? CNN Reports.

CNN interviews GetEducated.com’s Vicky Phillips about online education and distance learning, which can help you find a new or better job.

Been told you need a degree to advance at work? Want to change your career? Confused about the difference between a master’s and a bachelor’s degree? Uncertain if you even need a degree? Remember the Golden Rule: Never buy more education than you truly need.

Unsure about what education you need? Post your unique situation to our Forum (http://www.geteducated.com/forums) and we’ll do the hard work for you. Our researchers will dig up the best online degrees to move you toward your career goals and respond, personally, within 24 hours!

Online degrees are increasingly viewed as equal to a traditional brick and mortar education. For more information about employer acceptance & online degree reputation visit: http://www.geteducated.com/expert-advice/careers/318-should-i-tell-employers-i-earned-my-degree-online

Get Educated also provides online college rankings and ratings so you can find online learning programs you can trust. GetEducated.com includes many less-expensive programs from public colleges to save you money on online education. An online degree can cost as little as ,000 or more than 0,000 and paying more for your online education won’t guarantee you a better experience or job after graduation.

At Get Educated, we’ve surveyed more than 3,000 accredited online degree programs. Our exclusive cost rankings reveal the best affordable online degrees—we call them “Best Buys”—from online colleges nationwide. Check our fact-based lists of America’s most affordable online degrees before you enroll: http://www.geteducated.com/online-college-ratings-and-rankings
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Education Q&a With OECD’s Andreas Schleicher

Education Q&a With OECD’s Andreas Schleicher

Education Q&A with OECD's Andreas Schleicher

OECD Acting Director for the Directorate of Education and Skills, Andreas Schleicher answers crowdsourced questions for the Global Education and Skills Forum, 2014.

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Find out more about the Global Education & Skills Forum: http://www.educationandskillsforum.org

Questions:
— Will we ever see an international assessment that tracks student learning across multiple years?

— Do parents have an impact on student success?

— Is there a risk that good PISA scores might lead to complacency?

— Is the humanistic approach to evaluation an important indicator?

Transcript – We need to become better at tracking student learning growths not at just seeing where students are at any point in time but also seeing how they actually progress in their learning pathways. And actually a lot is happening in that field. In fact, the PISA assessment as we have it currently focusing on 15 year olds is looking into expanding to lower grades so that we can actually get at least at the synthetic level some sense of the progress that is being made in education raising quality, improving equity and also value for money.

The PISA data show that parents have a very significant influence on the success of their children. We see that where parents have a greater expectations on education, where parents are more closely involved in the education of their children results are significantly better. And it’s not only in terms of the academic performance of students but it’s also in terms of their attitudes toward learning, their enjoyment of learning. Their persistence when things get tough in school. So parental involvement is very important.

We also see that that parental involvement isn’t about having an academic degree as a parent or spending hours of time on homework. It’s really the interest parents show for the education of their children. For example, when parents regularly ask their children, you know, “How was school today? What did go wrong?” We can see those kids actually having a significantly higher performance at school than kids — even kids from wealthy neighborhoods where parents do not show that level of engagement. So a very important ingredient for success is to make parents part of the equation. If you do well you might think you don’t need to improve. But, in fact, the PISA data do not lend much evidence to this. In fact, some of the most rapidly improving systems are some of the best performing systems. They want to move from good to great. They’re actually seeing, you know, how is the labor demand shaping up in the future. What are the kind of knowledge and skills that we need to improve on? I’ll give you an example. You can look at Singapore. Singapore has always done well on math and science tests. But Singaporean educators have not been satisfied with this. They’re looking to how can we strengthen students ways of thinking, creativity, critical thinking, problem solving. Students ways of working, collaboration, teamwork and so on. So the education system is actually looking towards moving forward. Complacency is a risk but we do actually see very encouraging signals that improvement is taking place at every part of the system. You cannot improve what you can’t measure. So the measurement framework is really, really critically important. But we also do see incentives not only for our low performers to catch up but also for the strong performers to move forward further. It was a bit long?

A humanistic perspective is very important to evaluating educational results. In fact, we need to get away from looking at education with a single perspective. Evaluation can only take part place in a framework of multiple kinds of perspectives. Looking at test data from students is one perspective. Looking at teachers views on student performance. Looking at other students — it’s this kind of multiplicity of instruments that actually help us improve education. And that’s true even at the level of teachers, you know. You can evaluate teachers on the basis of student learning outcomes. This is one perspective. But you also need to bring in other perspectives that value the broader responsibilities that teachers have. So looking at outcomes from multiple perspectives including these kind of quality — qualitative outlook is very, very important.

Directed and Produced by Jonathan Fowler
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GEMS Education Solutions’ Chris Kirk on Education Reform

GEMS Education Solutions’ Chris Kirk on Education Reform

GEMS Education Solutions CEO Chris Kirk education reform in both developed and developing countries.

Find out more about the Global Education & Skills Forum: http://www.educationandskillsforum.org

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Transcript — We do have a real crisis in education. In the developing world, in Africa and Asia, we still have so many children out of school. Often the figure that is cited is around 140 million children, some people are saying as high as 250 million children who do not have access to a school place. But actually there’s also a question what do we do once of those children are in school? Because many of them are in a class where the teacher is not qualified or indeed where the teacher is completely absent from that class.
In the developed world the issue is equally strong because we’re spending 12 years of a child’s education and they are leaving school and they don’t have the skills that employers and society say that they need them to have. And we have mass youth unemployment. We have a lot of a graduate unemployment. And at the same time we had a real gap between the skills that are required and what it is that those young people are able to do.

I think it’s really important that we look at the data, we look at the evidence of what works when we’re looking at how to do you make every school a great school. For example, here in GEMS Education Solutions we’ve developed a methodology for supporting schools in improvement. And at the heart of that is an understanding of how you make a school better. First of all it’s about educational excellence. We need to look at the quality of leadership, quality of teaching, the curriculum. Very importantly how a teacher’s empowered to plan, assess, develop their practice and be the lead people for taking the profession forwards. And by doing that we find that standards can rise much more quickly. But equally important, how do we engage the parents? This is a key part of educational effectiveness. We know that children with engaged parents improve in their educational quality much more quickly than those with parents who were disengaged in education.

The other side of the coin into education effectiveness is operational effectiveness. And this is something that we in educations have only recently become much better at. This is about how do we efficiently deploy the resources that we have. It’s also about how do we introduce the right processes in our schools. Businesses will look in detail at their processes, what is it that we do from top to bottom to deliver the right result. In schools, often it can be more intuitive. However, by analyzing the key processes in a school and actually making sure that each of them is being delivered in the most efficient way by the right people using the right technology, we can actually help to use our money better. And this is the point around financial effectiveness because if we are delivering high quality education and we’re doing it in a way which is operationally effective, then we’re making the best use of our resources.

It’s also very important to make sure that all of the stakeholders are really engaged in the work you’re doing. So what is it that the parents think, what do the teachers think, what do the students think. How does it all come together to make sure that we have a school that’s going to continue to improve, be critical of itself and do the very best it can for its community.
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