Dr. Andrew Weil: The Pursuit of Happiness | Big Think Mentor

Dr. Andrew Weil: The Pursuit of Happiness | Big Think Mentor

In his Big Think Mentor (http://goo.gl/kVXvR) workshop on Spontaneous Happiness, Dr. Andrew Weil teaches a program designed to protect and enhance emotional well-being through a holistic approach to retraining body, mind, and spirit.

In this workshop, you’ll learn to:

– Take a holistic and realistic approach to unlocking “spontaneous happiness.”
– Integrate Eastern and Western approaches to positive psychology.
– Use specific breathing exercises and meditations designed to develop mindfulness
– Optimize your diet to support emotional well-being
– Build physical habits that support emotional well-being

The word happiness, derived from a Norse root meaning luck or fortune, encapsulates the essential flaw in how most of us go about looking for it. We tend to view happiness as an all-or-nothing, potentially permanent state, and as something that’s visited upon or snatched away from us by chance. Lost your job? You’re unhappy. Just fell in love? Happy. The idea that “true happiness” is of a uniformly high emotional pitch, and our tendency to expect it from external things ironically ends up causing us a great deal of suffering.

The holistic health practitioner Dr. Andrew Weil, along with most psychologists these days, more often uses the term well-being, which recognizes that a wide range of emotions are possible and perfectly normal in a psychologically healthy person. Weil goes even farther, citing research that suggests that the common, non-crippling form of depression, usually treated as a pathology, may actually be an evolutionary adaptation that helps people with focus and problem solving.

In Spontaneous Happiness, his five-part workshop for Big Think Mentor, Weil teaches a program designed to protect and enhance emotional well-being through specific lifestyle changes. You’ll learn to:

– Take a holistic and realistic approach to unlocking “spontaneous happiness.”
– Integrate Eastern and Western approaches to positive psychology.
– Use specific breathing exercises and meditations designed to develop mindfulness
– Optimize your diet to support emotional well-being
– Build physical habits that support emotional well-being

Big Think Interview With John Irving

Big Think Interview With John Irving

Big Think sits down with the author of twelve novels, including “Last Night in Twisted River.”
Video Rating: / 5

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Watch the rest of Niel deGrasse Tyson’s interview http://bigthink.com/neildegrassetyson. Neil deGrasse Tyson says Newton’s writings defy gravity by making his hair stand up.

Question: Who’s the greatest physicist in history?DeGrasse Tyson:    Isaac Newton.  I mean, just look… You read his writings.  Hair stands up… I don’t have hair there but if I did, it would stand up on the back of my neck.  You read his writings, the man was connected to the universe in ways that I never seen another human being connected.  It’s kind of spooky actually.  He discovers the laws of optics, figured out that white light is composed of colors.  That’s kind of freaky right there.  You take your colors of the rainbow, put them back together, you have white light again.  That freaked out the artist of the day.  How does that work?  Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet gives you white.  The laws of optics.  He discovers the laws of motion and the universal law of gravitation.  Then, a friend of his says, “Well, why do these orbits of the planets… Why are they in a shape of an ellipse, sort of flattened circle?  Why aren’t… some other shape?”  He said, you know, “I can’t… I don’t know.  I’ll get back to you.”  So he goes… goes home, comes back couple of months later, “Here’s why.  They’re actually conic sections, sections of a cone that you cut.”  And… And he said, “Well, how did find this out?  How did you determine this?”  “Well, I had to invent integral and differential calculus to determine this.”  Then, he turned 26.  Then, he turned 26.  We got people slogging through calculus in college just to learn what it is that Isaac Newtown invented on a dare, practically.  So that’s my man, Isaac Newton. 

Question: Who’s the greatest physicist in history?DeGrasse Tyson:    Isaac Newton.  I mean, just look… You read his writings.  Hair stands up… I don’t have hair there but if I did, it would stand up on the back of my neck.  You read his writings, the man was connected to the universe in ways that I never seen another human being connected.  It’s kind of spooky actually.  He discovers the laws of optics, figured out that white light is composed of colors.  That’s kind of freaky right there.  You take your colors of the rainbow, put them back together, you have white light again.  That freaked out the artist of the day.  How does that work?  Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet gives you white.  The laws of optics.  He discovers the laws of motion and the universal law of gravitation.  Then, a friend of his says, “Well, why do these orbits of the planets… Why are they in a shape of an ellipse, sort of flattened circle?  Why aren’t… some other shape?”  He said, you know, “I can’t… I don’t know.  I’ll get back to you.”  So he goes… goes home, comes back couple of months later, “Here’s why.  They’re actually conic sections, sections of a cone that you cut.”  And… And he said, “Well, how did find this out?  How did you determine this?”  “Well, I had to invent integral and differential calculus to determine this.”  Then, he turned 26.  Then, he turned 26.  We got people slogging through calculus in college just to learn what it is that Isaac Newtown invented on a dare, practically.  So that’s my man, Isaac Newton.

Big Think Interview With John Irving

Big Think Interview With John Irving

Big Think sits down with the author of twelve novels, including “Last Night in Twisted River.”

Bill Nye: Creationism Is Not Appropriate For Children

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Evolution is the fundamental idea in all of life science, in all of biology. According to Bill Nye, aka “the science guy,” if grownups want to “deny evolution and live in your world that’s completely inconsistent with everything we observe in the universe, that’s fine, but don’t make your kids do it because we need them.”

— Transcript:
Denial of evolution is unique to the United States. I mean, we’re the world’s most advanced technological—I mean, you could say Japan—but generally, the United States is where most of the innovations still happens. People still move to the United States. And that’s largely because of the intellectual capital we have, the general understanding of science. When you have a portion of the population that doesn’t believe in that, it holds everybody back, really.

Evolution is the fundamental idea in all of life science, in all of biology. It’s like, it’s very much analogous to trying to do geology without believing in tectonic plates. You’re just not going to get the right answer. Your whole world is just going to be a mystery instead of an exciting place.

As my old professor, Carl Sagan, said, “When you’re in love you want to tell the world.” So, once in a while I get people that really—or that claim—they don’t believe in evolution. And my response generally is “Well, why not? Really, why not?” Your world just becomes fantastically complicated when you don’t believe in evolution. I mean, here are these ancient dinosaur bones or fossils, here is radioactivity, here are distant stars that are just like our star but they’re at a different point in their lifecycle. The idea of deep time, of this billions of years, explains so much of the world around us. If you try to ignore that, your world view just becomes crazy, just untenable, itself inconsistent.

And I say to the grownups, if you want to deny evolution and live in your world, in your world that’s completely inconsistent with everything we observe in the universe, that’s fine, but don’t make your kids do it because we need them. We need scientifically literate voters and taxpayers for the future. We need people that can—we need engineers that can build stuff, solve problems.

It’s just really hard a thing, it’s really a hard thing. You know, in another couple of centuries that world view, I’m sure, will be, it just won’t exist. There’s no evidence for it.

Directed / Produced by
Jonathan Fowler and Elizabeth Rodd
Video Rating: / 5